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July 25th, 2006

on attachment & visitors

Despite my lack of motivation concerning the assignment due yesterday afternoon my half-finished product put me in a better position than my instructor, who had looked at the reading over the weekend and decided that it wasn't worth the bother. Aynesworth goes into so much detail, yet at the same time this means that some of her descriptive categories suffer from an over-complexification that borders on the absurd. My new reading assignment is Mary True's dissertation on Mother-infant attachment and communication among the Dogon of Mali, with a focus on examining the Maternal Sensitivity Hypothesis. I hope it goes a little easier than my last foray into attachment theory.

In other news, I found a beetle trundling across the floor of our living room this afternoon. One thing I've noticed about my current apartment is that there don't seem to be anywhere near as many spiders as the house I lived in before. My old bedroom probably received more than its fair share of arachnids from its location next to an outside door that wouldn't close all the way - providing refuge to all manner of guests. Seeing spiders on a regular basis may not be the greatest thing in the world, but they wouldn't stick around if it weren't for the presence of a steady food supply. Fewer spiders in our apartment implies that there's less for them to eat. My flatmate did come across a centipede in her room before leaving for the summer though; it seems there is at least one other invertebrate predator sharing our home.

thank god i'm a country boy?

I had two very vivid dreams last night, and both featured one particular person from my livejournal friends list. We were at a festival of Appalachian and Celtic folk music - although festival may not be the best way to describe the small, scattered groups of musicians and craft specialists spread out over an otherwise empty landscape - as the last rays of the sun were sliding toward the horizon to herald the transition from twilight into dusk. The area didn't look like anywhere I've actually been in the past, although the location did vaguely remind me of Bragg Valley outside Calgary - home to the Tsuu T'ina Nation Pow Wow in Canada.

I don't know why we were at an event dedicated to folk music. There are enough other landmarks in Washington to show this friend that there shouldn't be any strong reason to create new environments for us to explore. As the darkness grew in intensity camp fires sprang up around each collection of performers. I can recall watching a young girl playing a feadóg stáin (tin whistle) and was apparently surprised to hear her include a short strain from the movie "Flight of the Navigator" into a piece of her own composition. How I would be able to identify a musical segment from a 1986 live action Disney movie is anyone's guess. Oh well. Such is the power of dreams.

Upon returning home in the early hours of the next morning my dream self noticed a message posted to the front page of Yahoo in relation to the festival from a man who had played the night before. In his message he encouraged readers to come out for a second night and concluded with an interesting remark that's still in my mind ...

Because God wanted us to have something wonderful he gave us music. After that he gave us unrequited, unattainable, and broken love to balance things out ... and for inspiration, so we'd have something to write about no matter where we found ourselves in the world.